Our tongues: What do we do with them?

by | Dec 5, 2022 | 15 weeks of talking tips

Tip#8: Your tongue is vital to your speech

 

 

Have you ever considered how important your tongue is to talking?  Without it, we would be hard-pressed to make our speech sounds.  Our tongue is vital to speaking.  It moves in the most intricate ways to make all of the nuances in our speech.  It moves quickly, with precision.

 

Functions

Our tongues are made up of many layers of muscle that are anchored at the base of our mouth as part of the structure of our jaw. The muscles have mass and sensation. We taste with our tongues and use our tongues to distinguish flavors.  Our tongues are instrumental in our ability to swallow, propelling our food and liquid to our esophagus, adding saliva as the food moves along.

 

Our tongues also have a special resting spot when we aren’t speaking. That resting spot when maintained correctly helps keep the tone of our tongue and lip muscles intact.

 

Speaking specifically

Where speech is concerned, our tongues play a role in the majority of our sounds.  Our tongues ride the jaw elevator up and down and have a role in the way our different vowels are produced and sound.  For some vowels, our tongue is high in the mouth.  For others it is low.  Our tongue moves in a forward to back position for each of our vowels as well.

 

The majority of our consonants are said with our tongues, using differing parts for differing sounds.  For instance, the tip of our tongue is used when we make a t and d.  The blade of our tongue (the portion just back from the tip) is used when saying a ch.  The back of our tongue plays a role with k and g.

 

Our tongue makes contact in our mouth in many ways, The tip, blade and back rise to the palate (rood of our mouth) in varying spots.  The sides also raise up to our molars and are critical when we make an r.

 

Consider this: we don’t speak one sound at a time but rather articulate one sound right after another.  We even anticipate a sound before we say it and while we are saying the one preceding it.  Our tongue gets ready to move into position and moves out quickly to the next.

 

Our tongue is vital to our speech.  It is vital to how we make our sounds, how clearly we speak and how quicky we are able to do it.  That in a nutshell is what we do our tongue!

Tip#8: Your tongue is vital to your speech

Have you ever considered how important your tongue is to talking? Without it, we would be hard-pressed to make our speech sounds. Our tongue is vital to speaking. It moves in the most intricate ways to make all of the nuances in our speech. It moves quickly, with precision.

Our tongues are made up of many layers of muscle that are anchored at the base of our mouth as part of the structure of our jaw. The muscles have mass and sensation. We taste with our tongues and use our tongues to distinguish flavors. Our tongues are instrumental in our ability to swallow, propelling our food and liquid to our esophagus, adding saliva as the food moves along.

Our tongues also have a special resting spot when we aren’t speaking. That resting spot when maintained correctly helps keep the tone of our tongue and lip muscles intact.

Where speech is concerned, our tongues play a role in the majority of our sounds. Our tongues ride the jaw elevator up and down and have a role in the way our different vowels are produced and sound. For some vowels, our tongue is high in the mouth. For others it is low. Our tongue also moves in a forward to back position for each of our vowels as well.

The majority of our consonants are said with our tongues, using differing parts for differing sounds. For instance, the tip of our tongue is used when we make a t and d. The blade of our tongue (the portion just back from the tip) is used when saying a ch. The back of our tongue plays a role with k and g.

Our tongue makes contact in our mouth in many ways, The tip, blade and back rise to the palate (rood of our mouth) in varying spots. The sides also raise up to our molars and are critical when we make an r.

Consider this: we don’t speak one sound at a time but rather articulate one sound right after another. We even anticipate a sound before we say it and while we are saying the one preceding it. Our tongue gets ready to move into position and moves out quickly to the next.

Our tongue is vital to our speech. It is vital to how we make our sounds, how clearly we speak and how quicky we are able to do it. That in a nutshell is what we do our tongue!

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